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CDC Recommendations
     We are not out of the woods yet, but there does appear to be a light at the end of the tunnel (if I may be allowed the use of such cliches). To assure that the readers stay safe for the remainder of the year and into 2021, I have decided to keep this post active for one more iteration. Please stay safe.

     Both the CDC and U.S. State Department offer advice to travelers regarding the situtuation at foreign destinations. Before you panic and think the worse of a destination, visit their websites and look up the information applicable to your travel plans.
     Below is travel information based on the travelers advisory as issued by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).
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     CDC recommends that people avoid all nonessential travel.
     This disease (COVID-19) is a respitory illness and the viral symptoms range from mild to severe. Signs and symptoms of infection include fever, cough, and difficulty breathing. Sore throat also has been reported in some patients. Some patients also have reported a loss of taste and smell as well as a bout of diarrhea without other symptoms. This new coronavirus has caused severe disease and death in patients who developed pneumonia. Risk factors in older adults and those with chronic medical conditions may be at higher, but many younger people have seen a rise in cases, apparently because they did not socially distance or attended group events sans the proper facial covering.
    Additionally, with the current rise in cases, some foreign destinations have closed their borders to the American traveler, so check with the state department and the CDC what conditions must be met to gain entry to those destinations.

                       What can travelers do to protect themselves and others?

    













Pay attention to your health during travel and for 14 days after you leave and after your return.

If you spent time overseas during the past 14 days and feel sick with fever or cough or have difficulty breathing:














                                                                      Clinician Information

     Healthcare providers should obtain a detailed travel history for patients with fever or acute respiratory symptoms.  For patients with these symptoms and had onset of illness within 2 weeks of leaving, consider the novel coronavirus and notify infection control personnel and your local health department immediately.
    
     For additional healthcare infection control recommendations, visit CDC's Infection Control webpage.
Take your temperature.
Seek medical advice. Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
Avoid contact with others.
Do not travel while sick.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60%–95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
Avoid contact with sick people.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
Discuss travel to foreign destinations with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with chronic medical conditions may be at risk.
Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60%-95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
It is especially important to clean hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
Supplies of hand sanitizer, tissues, and other hygiene products may be limited, so consider bringing them with you.